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Sowing Truth in the Lives of Stewards


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by Gary Hoag

Recently, I read some of Steve Siebold’s research on “How Rich People Think” in America. Below (in bold) you will find five of his statements, which exemplify the world’s way of thinking. These ideas seek to shape our thinking and the stewards we serve. Steward leaders must understand these false narratives and respond with truth from God’s Word.

1. “Average people think MONEY is the root of all evil. Rich people believe POVERTY is the root of all evil.” Neither “having money” nor “not having money” is the root of all kinds of evil. 1 Timothy 6:10 tells us that the “love of money” is the root of all kinds of evil. With this statement, the world reveals that its hope is in money, and that hope is misplaced. Steward leaders realize this and teach others, that God, not money, is our only hope.

2. “Average people teach their children how to survive. Rich people teach their kids to get rich.” God’s word says “Life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.” Luke 12:15b. The world proclaims the opposite message to us and our kids. In John 10:10, we learn “abundant” life is only found in Jesus: teach that to your kids!

3. “Average people believe you have to DO something to get rich. Rich people believe you have to BE something to get rich.” Rather than thinking about doing something or being something to get rich, steward leaders focus on knowing and obeying God. His Son, Jesus teaches us that faithful stewardship, that is, using God’s resources according to His instructions is the path to possessing true riches. We find this in Luke 16:11. “So if you have not been trustworthy in handling worldly wealth, who will trust you with true riches?”

4. “Average people never make the connection between money and health. Rich people know money can save your life.” Psalm 49 outlines the understanding that must accompany riches: that riches cannot save us, satisfy us, or grant us the security we long for; only God can. Steward leaders make sure those they serve understand this. Meditate on Psalm 49 and perhaps invite others to do the same.

5. “Average people believe they must choose between a great family and being rich. Rich people know you can have it all.” Mark 8:36 reads, “What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul?” If you try to have it all, you will lose everything, but if you seek God first, Matthew 6:33 reminds us that those other things will be added to you. C.S. Lewis sums this up aptly in The Weight of Glory, “He who has God and everything else has no more than he who has God only.”

Sow truth in yourself first!

Want those you serve to understand and grasp these truths in a world filled with lies? I’ve found the best way to do this is by sowing these truths in your own life, and then in conversation, simply testify to that which you’ve learned. My prayer is that your testimony will have the humble, candid tone of the Apostle Paul (italics mine).

“I have learned the secret of living in every situation, whether it is with a full stomach or empty, with plenty or little. For I can do everything through Christ, who gives me strength.” Philippians 4:12b-13 (NLT)

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Gary Hoag is the Generosity Monk. Visit his website to learn more about encouraging Christian generosity.

 

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